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xx The piriformis muscle and the sciatic nerve
« Thread started on: Nov 19th, 2006, 10:53pm »

The piriformis muscle and the sciatic nerve

http://www.spine-health.com/topics/cd/overview/lumbar/misc/misc06.html
The piriformis muscle is a small muscle located in the buttocks that rotates the hip. It runs horizontally, and the sciatic nerve runs vertically directly beneath the muscle. The muscle can become tight and place pressure on the sciatic nerve, resulting in leg pain which may be difficult to distinguish from a radiculopathy (nerve pinching in the spine), which is also commonly called sciatica.
The patientís spinal imaging studies will not show any nerve pinching, and on physical exam, motion of the patient's hip will generate the pain.

Conservative care for piriformis syndrome
Treatment for piriformis syndrome typically consists of:

Physical therapy that includes manual release (deep massage), along with hip range of motion exercises can help piriformis sydrome.

For severe cases of piriformis sydrome, the muscle may be injected with lidocaine to decrease spasm and help the patient make progress in physical therapy.

By: Peter F. Ullrich, Jr., MD

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xx Re: The piriformis muscle and the sciatic nerve
« Reply #1 on: Apr 18th, 2007, 1:26pm »

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/piriformis_syndrome/piriformis_syndrome.htm


Table of Contents (click to jump to sections)
What is Piriformis Syndrome?
Is there any treatment?
What is the prognosis?
What research is being done?

Organizations


What is Piriformis Syndrome?
Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that occurs when the piriformis muscle compresses or irritates the sciatic nerve-the largest nerve in the body. The piriformis muscle is a narrow muscle located in the buttocks. Compression of the sciatic nerve causes pain-frequently described as tingling or numbness-in the buttocks and along the nerve, often down to the leg. The pain may worsen as a result of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running.

Is there any treatment?


Generally, treatment for the disorder begins with stretching exercises and massage. Anti-inflammatory drugs may be prescribed. Cessation of running, bicycling, or similar activities may be advised. A corticosteroid injection near where the piriformis muscle and the sciatic nerve meet may provide temporary relief. In some cases, surgery is recommended.

What is the prognosis?


The prognosis for most individuals with piriformis syndrome is good. Once symptoms of the disorder are addressed, individuals can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening.

What research is being done?


Within the NINDS research programs, piriformis syndrome is addressed primarily through studies associated with pain research. NINDS vigorously pursues a research program seeking new treatments for pain and nerve damage with the ultimate goal of reversing debilitating conditions such as piriformis syndrome.

Select this link to view a list of studies currently seeking patients.

Organizations

National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC)
4200 Forbes Boulevard
Suite 202
Lanham, MD 20706-4829
naricinfo@heitechservices.com
http://www.naric.com
Tel: 301-459-5900/301-459-5984 (TTY) 800-346-2742
Fax: 301-562-2401

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
P.O. Box 1968
(55 Kenosia Avenue)
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
orphan@rarediseases.org
http://www.rarediseases.org
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291





Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892




NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

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Last updated February 14, 2007
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